22 Dec 2010

Aussie Jingle Bells

1 Comment Typically Aussie
Dashing through the bush
In a rusty Holden Ute
Kicking up the dust
Esky in the boot
Kelpie by my side
Singing Christmas songs
It’s summer time and I am in
My singlet, shorts and thongsOh, Jingle Bells, Jingle Bells
Jingle all the way
Christmas in Australia
On a scorching summer’s day
Jingle Bells, Jingle Bells
Christmas time is beaut
Oh what fun it is to ride
In a rusty Holden Ute

Engine’s getting hot
Dodge the kangaroos
Swaggy climbs aboard
He is welcome too
All the family is there
Sitting by the pool
Christmas day, the Aussie way
By the barbecue!

Oh, Jingle Bells, Jingle Bells
Jingle all the way
Christmas in Australia
On a scorching summer’s day
Jingle Bells, Jingle Bells
Christmas time is beaut
Oh what fun it is to ride
In a rusty Holden Ute

Come the afternoon
Grandpa has a doze
The kids and Uncle Bruce
Are swimming in their clothes
The time comes round to go
We take a family snap
Then pack the car and all shoot through
Before the washing up

22 Dec 2010

Dec. 22 2010

No Comments Pic of the day, Sverige

A knight at a traditional jousting in Visby. (Sweden)


All photos in this category are taken by us and we appreciate if you don’t use them without our permission.

 

21 Dec 2010

Julbak 2010 – recept

1 Comment Recipes

Det blev massa bakat i helgen. Förutom pepparkakshuset, som gjordes med en jättesmart mall jag fick i julpresent, blev allt från listan utom smörkolan tillagat och jag tänkte bjuda på recepten till denna sockerfest.

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21 Dec 2010

Al Pitcher’s guide to Sweden – Part 1

No Comments Typically Swedish

Remember Al Pitcher that we posted a clip about a while a go – HERE? He now has a, what I think is an reoccurring section – Al Pitcher’s guide to Sweden, in a comedy show on SVT called Robins.

Al Pitcher – landets roligaste komiker

Al’s homepage

21 Dec 2010

How much do you know about koalas? – answers

No Comments Australia, Quiz

Here are the correct answers to the quiz. Haven’t seen it yet? Go have a look HERE before you cheat and look at the answers. Read more

Related Images:

21 Dec 2010

Sugar shock!

4 Comments Sverige

Yes, I think that’s a great way to sum up the weekend. Had a really nice time with Maraja, Nettchen and Jocke visiting. Besides making the gingerbread house there was lots of baking of cookies and lollies, I’ll post the recipes later on (in Swedish though I think).

Nettchen (normally a little shorter here standing on a stool), Jocke and Maraja.

 

Yes, even Simon did his fare share of baking, though the guys gingerbread house didn’t really turn out that well. They blame the dough, I’m not so sure. :P

We also invited one of Simon’s American classmate from SFI and his wife over to join us for a nice Chicken Parma dinner and to top the Saturday night off there was some hardcore midnight sledding on the schedule. Not sure what happened here but it looks like Simon went head first into the snow.

21 Dec 2010

Dec. 21 2010

No Comments Melbourne, Pic of the day

Southbank with Eureka Tower, Melbourne. (Australia)


All photos in this category are taken by us and we appreciate if you don’t use them without our permission.

 

20 Dec 2010

More than 50,000 km of coastline

No Comments Typically Aussie

That’s Australia for you. Plenty of beaches to go around. Australian Traveller listed 21 Secret Beaches (I guess they’re not so secret anymore) where you can get a beach to yourself this summer. Find the list below. Anyone been to any of them?


QUEENSLAND



Sunshine Beach

Where is it?
About 7 km south of Noosa, along David Low Way.
Why you’ll love it:
With 15 km of sand stretching all the way down to Peregian Beach, there’s always somewhere to get away from the madding crowds. It’s one of those quintessentially Australian beaches that overseas guests go all open-mouthed about, because it looks like it’s endless. It’s also got great surf and is dog friendly, and at the right time of year you’re bound to spot a few dolphins and whales.

Agnes Water
(Maria and I actually went here on our QLD tour and it’s really nice, unfortunately we were to sick to go surfing at the time.)

Where is it?
Agnes Water is Queensland’s northernmost surf beach, about 485 km north of Brisbane and halfway between Bundaberg and Gladstone. While it’s no secret to locals, many out-of-towners have no idea this region is sitting here just waiting to be explored.
Why you’ll love it:
What’s not to love about a pristine beach fringed by casuarinas and a ‘town’ (comprising a supermarket, couple of cafes, bakery, pharmacy, petrol station and not much else) that oozes laid-back charm. Apart from Agnes Water’s main beach, there are loads of beaches nearby with hardly a soul on them. Because many are in the national park and only accessible by 4WD, you may find the only footprints on the sand are yours. It also makes a great starting point for a Barrier Reef visit and is great for diving, fishing and sailing.


NEW SOUTH WALES



Wonboyn Beach

Where is it?
South of Ben Boyd National Park, Wonboyn Beach fringes Nadgee Nature Reserve.

Why you’ll love it:
The NSW government has made Wonboyn and surrounds a recreational fishing haven, and its clean, clear, fish-filled waters are testament to that. It’s never too crowded and the locals are lovely. The southern end of the beach, known as Greenglades, is great for surfing. It’s unpatrolled and a long way from help, though, so be careful when swimming here. And bring your own food in because, as they say, it’s a long way to the shops if you want a Chiko Roll.

Garie Beach

Where is it?
It’s in a remote coastal valley in the Royal National Park, 40 km south of Sydney.

Why you’ll love it:
Garie is supposedly an Aboriginal word for sleepy, and on most days, especially during the week, it lives up to its name. It’s a great spot for hiking and is terrific for a surf. Hard-core walkers and waxheads might like to book a bed at the couldn’t-be-more-basic Garie Beach YHA, a beach shack with no electricity, fridge, phone or shower, but it does have running water and a drop loo. Take your own toilet paper, torch and food. It’s not for everyone, but if you want to escape from it all for a couple of days and don’t mind roughing it, it’s great. And you can rent out the whole place if you want to go with a group.

Maitland Bay

Where is it?
Secluded, calm and great for families, Maitland Bay beach is in Bouddi National Park, 20 km south-east of Gosford. It’s a 20-minute walk from the Maitland Bay information centre on Maitland Bay Drive, downhill through eucalypt forest. Chill out on the sand and enjoy a picnic – but conserve a bit of energy because it’s a steep slog on the way back up. Alternatively, if you’re feeling fit, you can head on to Putty Beach via Gerrin Point lookout and arrive back at your car along the Bulimah Spur Track. The circuit is 6km, and will take about 2hrs 15mins to walk if you don’t stop to take in the beautiful scenery. Nearest camp grounds are also at Putty Beach.

Why you’ll love it:
The bushwalking here is half the fun. Be sure to take pause at Maitland Bay beach, however, because it truly is a sensational spot. At low tide you can see the wreck of the paddle steamer Maitland, which ran onto the rocks in 1898. Also great for snorkelling!

Dreamtime Beach

Where is it?
Just south of Tweed Heads in northern NSW, near Fingal Head.

Why you’ll love it:

Twenty million years ago Mount Warning erupted, producing the current dramatic backdrop of black cliffs and unique formations such as the Giant’s Causeway out in the bay. Combined with stretches of fine white sand and lush green foliage, it’s pretty close to paradise. There are plenty of accommodation options, from Kingscliff caravan parks to luxury holiday rentals such as Dreamtime Beach House, which won the Royal Institute of Architects’ Gold Coast House of the Year award in 2005.

Store Beach

Where is it?
A stone’s throw from Manly, but the only way to get there is by water. Hire a kayak at Manly Wharf – it will take you about 20 minutes to paddle to the beach. Just ask the kindly kayak keepers which way to point your nose.

Why you’ll love it:
There’s hardly ever anyone there on weekdays and it’s a breeding ground for little penguins. Bliss out in the sun before heading back. You’ll feel like you’ve done your exercise for the day, too.

Mungo Beach

Where is it?
Mungo Beach stretches for more than 20 km on the ocean side of Myall Lakes National Park, near Bulahdelah. It’s about 235 km north of Sydney via the Pacific Highway and The Lakes Way. To access the beach you will need a 4WD.

Why you’ll love it:
If you’re into fishing and four-wheel-driving, this is the perfect place for you. Powerful rips and deep drop-offs mean this is not a beach for swimming, but the area is full of lakes to cool off in, too.


VICTORIA



Killarney Beach

Where is it?
Killarney Beach is near Port Fairy, around 380 km west of Melbourne via the Great Ocean Road.

Why you’ll love it:
The offshore reef makes this a nice calm spot for kids, and there’s a camping reserve right behind the dunes. It’s also great for fishing.

Kitty Miller Beach

Where is it?
You’ll find the beach off Kitty Miller Rd, on the south-western side of Phillip Island. Phillip Island is 140 km south-east of Melbourne (a 90-minute drive).

Why you’ll love it:
This secluded cove at the base of an extinct volcano not only has great surf, but it boasts that windswept and interesting, rugged appeal you look for in a Victorian beach (well, more northerly Australian dwellers might, anyway). Strong rips and the odd shark sighting mean surfers should take care, and swimmers should look elsewhere for a dip. Go beachcombing instead. Also keep an eye out for the shipwrecked remains of the SS Speke at low tide.

Golden Beach

Where is it?
Golden Beach is near Sale, 252 km from Melbourne, and is just one of the delightful spots along Ninety Mile Beach – which is, of course, 90 miles (or 145 km) of golden sand and rolling surf that stretches almost the entire length of Gippsland from Port Albert, near Yarram, north to Lakes Entrance.

Why you’ll love it:
You could find a spot to yourself anywhere along Ninety Mile Beach, but we rate Golden Beach for its great ocean fishing, surfing and wildlife. Be prepared to see heaps of kangaroos, native birds and even emus and echidnas – the reputed recluses of the animal kingdom – from the coastal tracks around here. There’s a huge fishing competition here on the Australia Day long weekend, when the secret gets out, so it’s best to come at another time to appreciate its seclusion.


TASMANIA



Friendly Beaches

Where is it?
Within Freycinet National Park, Friendly Beaches are 20km south of Bicheno on the Coles Bay Road.

Why you’ll love it:
Freycinet is Tassie’s most popular coastal park, and the famous Wineglass Bay can get positively overrun during summer holidays. Not so Friendly Beaches, with their squeaky white silicone sand, crystal clear water and views that stretch forever. With the pelican-covered Saltwater Lagoon at one end and Freshwater Lagoon at the other, in reality Friendly Beaches are really just one very long stretch of pristine sand stroked by an aqua ocean. Because they’re so often completely people-free, it’s a good spot to try your hand (and the rest of your body) at skinny-dipping. Just be careful of rips, because these are ocean beaches and at the mercy of strong tidal currents. That could get embarrassing for both you and the rescue party.

Lime Beach

Where is it?
This beautiful beachside camping spot is part of the Coal Mines Historic Site on the north-eastern shore of the Tasman Peninsula, not far from Saltwater River, a 25-minute drive from Port Arthur.

Why you’ll love it:
Leave behind the crowds of Port Arthur and wander freely though the evocative ruins of Saltwater River Convict Station with its dingy underground cells – and a waterfront view to die for. The beach is fringed by limestone rocks that have been sculpted by the wind, and there are ample opportunities for wildlife, wildflower and bird spotting.

Ocean Beach

Where is it?
6km west of Strahan on Tasmania’s wild – and often wet – west coast.

Why you’ll love it:
This 40 km stretch of coast is Tasmania’s longest beach, with nothing but rolling waves and fresh air between you and the east coast of South America. Go horse riding along the beach, sandboarding on the dunes, or simply watch the sun sink into the sea at the edge of the world. Sure, it might not be the best beach for swimming and sunbaking (you shouldn’t be doing that anyway!), but it is certainly one of the most beautiful and most isolated beaches in the world.

Taroona Beach

Where is it?
Taroona is a mere 15-minute drive south of Hobart, via Sandy Bay Road.

Why you’ll love it:
A great beach for rock hopping, the water is perfect for kids and there is a playground in the park nearby. It’s the ultimate spot to view the Sydney to Hobart yacht race when the participants come around Storm Bay and into the Derwent River. You’ll find a wealth of shells and marine molluscs (anecdotally, Taroona is the local Aboriginal word for chiton, a type of mollusc). You’ll also see all sorts of birds such as cormorants, terns, gulls, herons and eagles.


SOUTH AUSTRALIA


Maslin Beach



Where is it?
Maslin Beach is on the Fleurieu Peninsula, about an hour’s drive from Adelaide, via the Southern Expressway.

Why you’ll love it:
In 1975 the southern section of beach was declared Australia’s first official nude beach, but there’s plenty of room left over if you prefer swimming in Speedos. Grab a snorkel and check out the leafy sea dragons (an actual creature, not a euphemism) or take a walk along the picturesque cliffs that flank the beach. You get a great view of the sunset from up there. Once you’ve had your fill of sun and sand, you can head off to sample what the McLaren Vale wineries have to offer.

Memory Cove

Where is it?
It’s part of Lincoln National Park, 50 km south of Port Lincoln and 650 km south-west of Adelaide. Access to Memory Cove Wilderness Area is 4WD-only.

Why you’ll love it:
The five campsites are right on the beach, the scenery is seriously stunning, the fishing excellent, and with no more than 15 vehicles allowed in at any one time, it’s never going to be crowded. This is truly one of the most elite experiences you can have in Australia, but without the five-star prices. It’s just $8.50 for park entry per car, a $6 camping fee per car, and $16 per vehicle per night.


WESTERN AUSTRALIA



Bennion Beach

Where is it?
Bennion Beach is in the northern suburbs of Perth, about a half-hour drive from the centre of the city.
Why you’ll love it:
You can stay in the heart of Perth and still savour the secluded nature of this incredible sheltered white-sand beach strewn with giant clusters of limestone. Most of the summer crowds hang at neighbouring Trigg Beach, so you can snorkel and explore the surrounding reef in peace. People from the eastern states always get a kick out of a WA beach sunset, so stick around and watch the colours stain the sky.

Point Ann

Where is it?
Point Ann is in the western section of Fitzgerald River National Park, 180 km north-east of Albany. Best access is via Bremer Bay.
Why you’ll love it:
It’s one of just two places in Australia (the other is Head of Bight in South Australia) where southern right whales come to calve in large numbers. There are two whale-watching platforms and best time to go to make use of it is June through to October.

Lucky Bay

Where is it?
Cape Le Grand National Park, 50 km south-east of Esperance by sealed road.
Why you’ll love it:
Breathtaking scenery, beachside camping and a fantastic 15 km coastal walking trail from Le Grand Beach to Rossiter Bay along the edge of Cape Le Grand. You’ll find Lucky Bay at about the halfway point. You’ll also find southern grey kangaroos sunning themselves on the beach. If there are two many fisherman here for your liking, head around the point to Thistle Cove, where you’re unlikely to find a soul.


NORTHERN TERRITORY



Cobourg Peninsula

Where is it?
Garig Gunak Barlu National Park is around 570 km (by road) north-east of Darwin and is accessible only by 4WD. It’s impassable during the wet season, November-April. Bring all your own food, unless you count on catching some fish (which practically jump onto your hook!).
Why you’ll love it:
It’s a place of pristine beaches, carpeted in seashells, where turtles come up to lay their eggs and the world’s largest remaining herd of banteng (wild cattle) roam in the monsoon forests behind the high-tide mark. Even better, only 20 permits to enter the park are issued at any one time, so you know you’ve got the place pretty much to yourself. Forget about swimming though, this is saltwater crocodile country.


For more Typically Aussie things have a look HERE!

20 Dec 2010

Oprah’s Ultimate Australian Adventure is over

2 Comments Australia

Oprah’s ulitimate Australian adventure is over. She and her audience left Australia last Wednesday (December 15). The whole production was pretty impressive and I read on Tourism Australia‘s site the following facts about Oprah’s visit:

  • Approximately 400 people were employed to work on the production; approximately 200 are Harpo staff who travelled to Australia and about 200 were employed locally.
  • About 700 hours of footage has been filmed around Australia, which will form the basis of four episodes of “The Oprah Winfrey Show” produced in Australia – two consisting of field footage and two from the Sydney Opera House.
  • In addition to the contribution of Tourism Australia and various state and territory tourism organisations, Harpo and its corporate sponsors invested close to $7 million to make “Oprah’s Ultimate Australian Adventure” a reality.
  • Some of Australia’s biggest stars joined Oprah when she taped two shows at the Sydney Opera House on 14 December, including Russell Crowe, Bindi Irwin, Hugh Jackman, Nicole Kidman, Keith Urban and Olivia Newton-John.
  • There are approximately 6,000 audience members at each taping. The tickets were available free of charge.
  • The programs are set to air in January 2011 in syndication in the U.S. and in primetime in January 2011 on Network Ten in Australia.

Oprah travelled to Hamilton Island in Queensland, saw the Great Barrier Reef on a helicopter ride, travelled to Uluru in the Northern Territory, went to Melbourne and Sydney where she conquered the Harbour Bridge but she also treated her ultimate audience that travelled with her from the States to all kinds of amazing things.

VICTORIA

  • Audience members were treated to a helicopter ride over the Twelve Apostles, a hot air balloon ride, a Yarra River bike ride and a trip to see the Phillip Island penguin parade.  They also visited the laneways of Melbourne and attended an event in Federation Square with Oprah, Prime Minister Julia Gillard and Victorian Premier Ted Baillieu. 

NORTHERN TERRITORY

  • Audience members enjoyed the sunset over Uluru, and an Imma dance performed by the Traditional Owners of Uluru. They also visited the Gabarnmung caves with Margaret Katherine, elder and traditional owner and visited indigenous art galleries in Alice Springs.

TASMANIA

  • Six best friends of more than 25 years stayed at a beautiful Australian resort, went on a boat ride to see wild dolphins, seals and a humpback whale as well as the highest cliffs in the southern hemisphere. They headed to a luxury coastal sanctuary that overlooked the wide expanses of Great Oyster Bay, where local farms produce fresh, succulent oysters in some of the world’s cleanest waters. They also received a surprise visit from Gayle King at a local winery.

QUEENSLAND

  • Oprah and the ultimate viewers were treated to an exclusive beach barbecue with world famous Australian chef, Curtis Stone, on Whitehaven Beach. They also had a trip to the Great Barrier Reef, a jetski tour, a bush walk, and a sail around the Whitsunday Islands. Daintree
  • Six guests took an exclusive trip to the Daintree, where the rainforest meets the reef. They took an Aboriginal walk to a waterfall, learned about Aboriginal culture, enjoyed a river cruise and helicoptered over The Great Barrier Reef.

WESTERN AUSTRALIA

  • The ultimate viewers took in a Margaret River tour, a scenic chopper flight, Kings Park Indigenous Heritage tour, a bike ride, the Ngilgi Cave tour and a didgeridoo dance performance. They also snorkelled, took in Indjidup Beach and had a surf lesson.

AUSTRALIA CAPITAL TERRITORY

  • Audience members visited the Australian War Memorial in Canberra, including a tour of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, aircraft hall including U.S. exhibits, and Afghanistan Roll of Honour.  They also paid a visit to the National Gallery of Australia, the Embassy of the United States and Parliament House

SOUTH AUSTRALIA

  • The audience interacted with untamed native wildlife on Kangaroo Island, ‘Australia’s Galapagos’, indulged in fine food and wine from the Barossa, met outback characters and marvelled at the incredible landscapes of the Flinders Ranges and Coober Pedy.

NEW SOUTH WALES

  • Ultimate viewers went on eco-tours to explore the forests in Blue Mountains, valleys and cliff tops, see kangaroos in the wild and enjoy easy bushwalks in the crisp mountain air.  They also enjoyed a nocturnal wildlife spotlighting and stargazing tour and colonial heritage tour.

  • The ultimate audience went to Byron Bay and had a surprise visit from Australian actress Olivia Newton-John. They had a sing-a-long with her and a serenade by Ms Newton-John, and enjoyed dancing with drummers and a hilltop Aboriginal ceremonial meditation. They did some surfing, kayaking, snorkelling and also yoga on the beach at sunrise.

  • The audience had a private seaplane ride along the coast in the Hunter Valley, a sunrise hot air balloon ride over the vineyards and an exciting impromptu vow renewal in a chapel performed by another member of the “Ultimate Audience” who is a minister.

  • The viewers started their Australian adventure with bike and walking tours around the city of Sydney, a behind-the-scenes tour of the Sydney Opera House, and a visit to Taronga Zoo. They also enjoyed a party designed by leading Australian food editor and best-selling cookbook author, Donna Hay at The Royal Botanic Gardens and a regatta around Sydney Harbour. Oprah climbed Sydney Harbour Bridge with Gayle King and 249 audience members. They ended their Ultimate Australian Adventure with the two show tapings at the Sydney Opera House.
20 Dec 2010

Please come again

No Comments Quote of the day